Stop Whining Dems, You Own Obamacare. All Of It.

Henry Waxman made a plea at the end of Wednesday’s House hearing grilling of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. The California Democrat and liberal lion asked Republicans to reach across the aisle to work with Democrats to improve Obamacare.

Yes, Henry Waxman, who has made a career of ideological witch hunts and smash-mouth partisanship, wants a cease-fire over Obamacare, or so he says.

Source: http://www.realclearpolitics.com/2013/10/31/stop_whining_dems_you_own_obamacare_all_of_it_318952.html
Category: 9news   Ozil  

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NYC council votes to make tobacco-buying age 21

(AP) — Smokers under 21 will soon be barred from buying cigarettes in New York City.

The City Council voted Wednesday to raise the minimum age for purchasing cigarettes and electronic-vapor cigarettes from 18 to 21.

By passing the bill, New York became the most populous place in the U.S. to raise the tobacco-buying age that high.

The city’s current age limit of 18 is a federal minimum. It’s standard in many places.

Some states and communities have raised the age to 19. At least two towns have agreed to raise it to 21.

Advocates say higher age limits help prevent young people from taking up a hazardous habit.

Manufacturers have suggested young adult smokers may just turn to black-market merchants.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration supports the council’s plan.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/386c25518f464186bf7a2ac026580ce7/Article_2013-10-30-Smoking-Minimum%20Age/id-1e0d757346104319bf2d36e1a9b9276b
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Motorola Launches ‘Have It Your Way’ Smartphone Project

Tinkerers and designers, rejoice. Motorola’s new open source Project Ara promises to let you play with the guts of your smartphone to your heart’s content. There are other potential advantages to the modular hardware concept. Since parts can be easily swapped out, fewer phones — which often contain toxic elements such as lead and mercury — may end up in landfills.

Motorola’s making a big splash with the launch of Project Ara, an ambitious, open source hardware initiative that allows consumers to customize their entire phone, down to the specific components and display.

Ara’s modular approach to phone design centers around an endoskeleton, or “endo,” that is the core frame holding the other components together. Consumers will be able to swap modules in and out however they like: an old processor ditched for a snappy new one; a large display excised for a smaller screen with a physical keyboard; an additional battery in place of a camera. They’ll also have the option of toying with the aesthetics through different-colored modules.

“We know there are a number of folks who like to tinker with their devices,” Ramon Lamas, research manager of mobile phones at IDC, told TechNewsWorld. “I think there’s going to be some interest out there, but you’re talking to a very select segment of the market as opposed to the mass market.”

Open Source Hardware Ecosystem

Motorola, which is a subsidiary of Google, thinks of Ara as Android for hardware. It plans to facilitate a thriving third-party ecosystem with developers and reduce time to market while ramping up the pace of innovation. It expects to release an alpha version of a Module Developer’s Kit this winter.

It’s not yet clear whether developers will flock to Ara — Motorola hasn’t hinted at much direct incentive beyond the suggestion of prizes or, perhaps more enticingly, the opportunity for a hardware developer to make a name for itself on a new platform.

“Based on my initial impressions, I think there’s going to be enough people with enough expertise to pull their resources together and create the pieces of the puzzle,” telecommunications analyst Jeff Kagan told TechNewsWorld. “Whether it’s going to be successful or not is the question.”

Motorola has teamed up with Dave Hakkens, designer of the Phonebloks concept. His vision was for a modular, open source phone that consumers could customize however they liked, which dovetailed neatly with Motorola’s vision for Ara, which it had been working on for more than a year.

Community Building

Motorola is cultivating the community Hakkens built after Phonebloks caught waves of press attention last month. It garnered more than 950,000 supporters after appearing on crowd-promoting site Thunderclap, and it will remain an independent organization. A successful open source project, Motorola has noted, requires both a robust platform and a thriving community.

There’s an environmental-awareness aspect to the project as well. Part of Hakkens’ impetus in creating his project was the fact that mobile phones — which often contain toxic elements such as lead and mercury — end up in landfills. Phonebloks and Ara aim to reduce waste and create an ecosystem of more sustainable hardware.

At this stage, it is not yet clear if or how consumers will adopt the concept. The enthusiasm and support for the Phonebloks concept certainly suggests there’s a market for simple phone hardware customization, yet the time, effort, and cost investment required in shaping an Ara device to personal preferences may prove too cumbersome for some customers.

“At the end of the day, you’re going to get a phone. It’s very easy to walk into AT&T and Verizon and walk out with a phone less than an hour later,” IDC’s Lamas said. “You’ve got to find those people who put that emphasis on design, who put that emphasis on customizability, and are willing to pay a little bit more for that capability.”

Source: http://www.technewsworld.com/rsstory/79298.html
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You can now tweet the gift of coffee to a deserving pal thanks to Starbucks

Need to pass along an afternoon pick-me-up to a Twitter pal? Well, now you can do so with a tweet thanks to Starbucks. The coffee giant’s “Tweet a Coffee” initiative allows for e-gifting $5 worth of joe with a mention of @tweetacoffee inside a 140-character message. Of course, you’ll have to connect …

Source: http://feeds.engadget.com/~r/weblogsinc/engadget/~3/oOmvO75YVFE/
Category: dracula   How To Close Apps On Ios7   Julie Chen   Colin Kaepernick   syria  

Making complex nanoparticles easily reproducible

Making complex nanoparticles easily reproducible

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Contact: Kevin Mayhood
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Case Western Reserve University

CWRU researchers receive grant to develop simple processes

CLEVELANDA pair of Case Western Reserve University researchers have received a $424,000 grant from the National Science Foundation’s Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation, to streamline manufacturing and assembly for two-sided nanoparticles.

Nicole Steinmetz, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering, and Rigoberto Advincula, professor of macromolecular science and engineering, aim to develop processes that can be used by industry.

The engineers are focusing on Janus particles, named for the Roman god of beginnings and transitions.

These-two sided particles could carry a one-two punch of paired medicines, or a drug on one side and a dye on the other that enables doctors using an MRI to see whether the particle penetrates a tumor. Or, the engineers can mix other properties on a particle to provide unique optics for displays, convert energy from one form to another or store data.

“Many things that are discovered never move out of the lab,” Steinmetz, an appointee of the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, said. “The challenge is to make complicated nanoparticles that are easily reproducible.”

“We’re interested in nanomanufacturing that produces a high yield,” Advincula said.

To make the technology realistic for the outside world, the researchers plan to make their particles in one phase, that is, pour all their ingredients into a test tube and produce a particle with different reactive surfaces, designed to host different functions, on each side.

Steinmetz’s part of the mix will produce spherical scaffolds using the cowpea mosaic virus or elongated scaffolds using tobacco mosaic virus. The shapes offer different advantages for different uses. She’ll engineer the genetics to control dimensions and surface chemistry.

Advincula’s ingredients will produce the reactive surfaces in the form of hyperbranching polymers.

“Typically, polymers are long single chains; we specialize in making polymer trees,” Advincula said. “Each branch is a reactive group. The branches concentrate the reactive groups at one site, increasing functionality at one location.”

The branches, for example, can be made to latch onto target molecules or develop into specific geometric shapes that are recognized by sensors or used to control or produce light.

The researchers believe that if they can make the processing simple and economical enough then pharmaceutical developers, electronics makers and other businesses will take advantage of the nanoparticles, producing devices that contribute to quality of life, sustainability, and technological competitiveness.


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Making complex nanoparticles easily reproducible

[ Back to EurekAlert! ]

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

28-Oct-2013

[

| E-mail

]


Share Share

Contact: Kevin Mayhood
kevin.mayhood@case.edu
216-368-4442
Case Western Reserve University

CWRU researchers receive grant to develop simple processes

CLEVELANDA pair of Case Western Reserve University researchers have received a $424,000 grant from the National Science Foundation’s Division of Civil, Mechanical and Manufacturing Innovation, to streamline manufacturing and assembly for two-sided nanoparticles.

Nicole Steinmetz, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering, and Rigoberto Advincula, professor of macromolecular science and engineering, aim to develop processes that can be used by industry.

The engineers are focusing on Janus particles, named for the Roman god of beginnings and transitions.

These-two sided particles could carry a one-two punch of paired medicines, or a drug on one side and a dye on the other that enables doctors using an MRI to see whether the particle penetrates a tumor. Or, the engineers can mix other properties on a particle to provide unique optics for displays, convert energy from one form to another or store data.

“Many things that are discovered never move out of the lab,” Steinmetz, an appointee of the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, said. “The challenge is to make complicated nanoparticles that are easily reproducible.”

“We’re interested in nanomanufacturing that produces a high yield,” Advincula said.

To make the technology realistic for the outside world, the researchers plan to make their particles in one phase, that is, pour all their ingredients into a test tube and produce a particle with different reactive surfaces, designed to host different functions, on each side.

Steinmetz’s part of the mix will produce spherical scaffolds using the cowpea mosaic virus or elongated scaffolds using tobacco mosaic virus. The shapes offer different advantages for different uses. She’ll engineer the genetics to control dimensions and surface chemistry.

Advincula’s ingredients will produce the reactive surfaces in the form of hyperbranching polymers.

“Typically, polymers are long single chains; we specialize in making polymer trees,” Advincula said. “Each branch is a reactive group. The branches concentrate the reactive groups at one site, increasing functionality at one location.”

The branches, for example, can be made to latch onto target molecules or develop into specific geometric shapes that are recognized by sensors or used to control or produce light.

The researchers believe that if they can make the processing simple and economical enough then pharmaceutical developers, electronics makers and other businesses will take advantage of the nanoparticles, producing devices that contribute to quality of life, sustainability, and technological competitiveness.


###


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]

 

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

Source: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-10/cwru-mcn102813.php
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Scientists dig for fossils in LA a century later

Ashely Farrell pulls a drawer filled with fossils in a paleontological lab at the George C. Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, in Los Angeles. On Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 the museum celebrates a century of excavation at the La Brea Tar Pits, considered the richest and most diverse collection of Ice Age fossils. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Ashely Farrell pulls a drawer filled with fossils in a paleontological lab at the George C. Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, in Los Angeles. On Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 the museum celebrates a century of excavation at the La Brea Tar Pits, considered the richest and most diverse collection of Ice Age fossils. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Laura Tewksbury, top, and Karrie Howard excavate more than 42,000-year-old bison fossils with dental picks at the La Brea Tar Pits on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, in Los Angeles. On Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 the George C. Page Museum celebrates a century of excavation at the La Brea Tar Pits, considered the richest and most diverse collection of Ice Age fossils. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Volunteer Mary Friedman helps excavate a bison skull in a paleontological lab at the George C. Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, in Los Angeles. On Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 the museum celebrates a century of excavation at the La Brea Tar Pits, considered the richest and most diverse collection of Ice Age fossils. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Nine-year-old Jason Dodoo looks at the skeleton of Naegele’s giant jaguar at the George C. Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, in Los Angeles. On Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 the museum celebrates a century of excavation at the La Brea Tar Pits, considered the richest and most diverse collection of Ice Age fossils. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Assistant lab supervisor Beau Campbell, right, sorts the fossils in a glass-walled paleontological lab as a group of students tour the George C. Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013, in Los Angeles. On Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 the museum celebrates a century of excavation at the La Brea Tar Pits, considered the richest and most diverse collection of Ice Age fossils. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

(AP) — Surrounded by a gooey graveyard of prehistoric beasts, a small crew diligently wades through a backlog of fossil finds from a century of excavation at the La Brea Tar Pits in the heart of Los Angeles.

Digs over the years have unearthed bones of mammoths, mastodons, saber-toothed cats, dire wolves and other unsuspecting Ice Age creatures that became trapped in ponds of sticky asphalt. But it’s the smaller discoveries — plants, insects and rodents — in recent years that are shaping scientists’ views of life in the region 11,000 to 50,000 years ago.

“Earlier excavations really missed a great part of the story,” said John Harris, chief curator at the George C. Page Museum, which oversees the fossil collection. People “were only taking out bones they could see, but it’s the hidden bones that provide clues to the environment.”

The museum on Monday celebrates 100 years of digging, which has recovered some 5.5 million bones representing more than 600 species of animals and plants, the richest cache of Ice Age fossils.

There’s so much left to do that it could easily take another century to complete. On a recent Wednesday, a volunteer in a white lab coat pounded away at a bison skull in the museum’s fishbowl laboratory where visitors can witness paleontology in action. Nearby, two workers hunched over microscopes, sorting bone fragments belonging to extinct creatures.

In the back storage, floor-to-ceiling shelves of wooden crates house bones that need to be cleaned, identified or labeled. The museum estimates it has 100,000 specimens to catalog and another million to scrub.

Long before skyscrapers towered over Wilshire Boulevard, giant beasts ruled the land. Back then, sagebrush scrub covered the basin, home to herds of mammoths, bison, camels and ground sloths. Mastodons hung out in the woodlands. Lurking were meat-eating predators including saber-toothed cats, dire wolves and giant jaguars.

Every so often, creatures would get bogged down in pools of water and asphalt that seeped from underground crude oil deposits, and die of dehydration or starvation. Stranded animals that appeared to be easy prey then became a trap for predators that also got stuck in the ooze.

In 1913, the predecessor to the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County launched a two-year project to uncover only the best-preserved mammal bones, largely ignoring everything else. Though the early digs gave scientists a glimpse into the types of animals that roamed, there was still much to be learned.

After the early missteps, scientists in 1969 decided to focus on pulling everything out and revisited a tar pit dubbed Pit 91 to do a more detailed excavation. For nearly 40 years, work at Pit 91 dominated the Page Museum’s efforts as visitors gawked from a viewing platform.

Museum officials temporarily halted digging at Pit 91 several years ago to concentrate on an unexpected trove of Ice Age fossils that was found during the construction of an underground garage next to the tar pits, located some 7 miles west of downtown Los Angeles.

“I can’t think of any other site that is as rich,” said Sarah George, executive director of the Natural History Museum of Utah.

Every time a foundation is dug, “more old blocks of tar filled with fossils came out of the ground,” said George, who used to work as a curator at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

Despite a century of digging, scientists still can’t agree on how the Ice Age beasts became extinct. Some suggested that the prehistoric predators may have competed with humans for similar prey and that carnivores ate carcasses out of desperation. But Larisa DeSantis of Vanderbilt University said dental studies of saber-toothed cats and other carnivores suggest they were “living the good life” before they became extinct.

Museum excavators plan to leave some fossils buried — in case better tools are invented to study them in the next century.

___

Follow Alicia Chang at http://twitter.com/SciWriAlicia

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/b2f0ca3a594644ee9e50a8ec4ce2d6de/Article_2013-10-27-La%20Brea%20Tar%20Pits/id-1d8adad0f66e4e7aad3c422067dbe592
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First Look: Ben Foster Is Lance Armstrong In An As-Yet Untitled Biopic Film

Just about a year ago, disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France wins after it was determined that he had used performance enhancing drugs to cheat his way to victory. A few months later, Armstrong came clean to Oprah Winfrey about his cheating and almost immediately, production of a biopic film about his life was set into motion. Today we get our first look at the first promo image from the as-yet untitled biopic film of Lance Armstrong‘s life as we get our first look at actor Ben Foster in character as Armstrong (you may recall that Bradley Cooper was reportedly cast for the role but that is for an entirely different Armstrong biopic film). Click below to check out this newly released photo and see how much Foster looks like Armstrong in this promo.

Signature yellow jersey, branded cap, and steely look of determination — here’s Ben Foster in full costume in this first look at the upcoming biopic about disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong. Director Stephen Frears’ still untitled film began production at the end of last week. With a supporting cast including Chris O’Dowd (Bridesmaids) as Irish sports journalist David Walsh, Jesse Plemons (Breaking Bad) as one of Armstrong’s fellow cyclists, and Guillaume Canet (Love Me If You Dare) as one of Armstrong’s rivals, the film will depict Armstrong’s rise and fall with a script penned by John Hodge of Trainspotting fame. Frears’ Armstrong flick isn’t the only one in the works. Director Jay Roach is attached to Red Blooded American starring Bradley Cooper, while J.J. Abrams is also planning a film about the cyclist. As if that’s not enough Armstrong, Alex Gibney’s documentary, The Armstrong Lie, will be getting limited release starting Nov. 8 and has already made the rounds at worldwide film festivals.

Personally, I don’t give a crap about Lance Armstrong‘s life. I don’t think that I’ll be bothering with any of the biopic films … but, that being said, I might be interested in seeing the documentary The Armstrong Lie. We’ve been subjected to far too much fiction with all of Lance‘s deceit so even a scathing fictionalization of his life story is completely uninteresting to me. Honestly, I’m just so grossed out by this man’s lies that I don’t know that I ever want to hear about it him ever again. Is he in jail yet? Will he be punished beyond being stripped of his winnings? Unless there is some sort of genuine punishment, I think my interest level in anything Armstrong is long gone. Even still, props to Ben Foster for looking so much like the man. I wish him well in his endeavor to become Armstrong for this film.

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Source: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/pinkisthenewblog/~3/Dzo5uxQgMWg/first-look-ben-foster-is-lance-armstrong-in-an-as-yet-untitled-biopic-film
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